Wednesday, May 9, 2012

My Favorite Hostas

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Hostas are a must have shade garden plant. Having as much shade as I do you know I have hostas. I guess I probably have about 30 cultivars growing in Tiger Gardens. Each year I get ambitious and try to document them all. And each year I fail miserably because trying to identify them is just a pain in the a#$. I just don't have the time or the need to really know what is what. Lately I have gotten better with labeling hostas as I plant them though so maybe one day I'll know all the cultivars, maybe not. 


At one time I did know what cultivar the above hosta is but it, like a lot of information, has slipped from my mind. I know this is a fragrant hosta that has wonderful blooms in mid-late summer. This hosta is huge and does not fade away in the garden when the summer really gets hot. If anyone recognizes it please chime in and tell me what you think it might be. I think it is 'Guacamole' but I am not sure. It is an excellent hosta!


I mention the above hosta because it is a hosta that is not only large and fragrant, but it stays looking good all season long. The problem with most hostas here in my gardens is that many of them emerge looking great in the spring only to fade away to ratty looking barely there plants come July or August. What fun is that in a shade garden? So, despite hostas being a must have shade garden plant they are a plant I do not ever go out of my way to buy or to plant. The ones I have are divided and spread around and I satisfy my need for hostas in this way. There is however a very wonderful hosta that I thought I would share with you all besides the above one.
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I have no doubt about the cultivar of this wonderful hosta; it is 'Christmas Tree'. This hosta is my most favorite hosta for its vigor, its good looks, and its ability to stay looking good all season long with no care from me. I started with a few pots years ago but have worked hard to spread this hosta around to all of the gardens. 'Christmas Tree' is a large hosta that has substantial leaves which I think helps it to stay looking good during the summer. 


There are a few more hostas I have luck with in Tiger Gardens but they will have to wait until I identify them and that might not be for a long time....


in the garden....




Words and Photos Property of In the Garden Blog Team, In the Garden

16 comments:

  1. I don't know the names of most of my hostas, either, Tina. Most of the original ones were passalongs or no-name bargains that have done surprisingly well here, so I don't think I'll ever be able to identify them. But I've tried to keep tags nearby the ones I've purchased in recent years. Hostas are such great, easy-care plants, and being able to divide them is a big plus for anyone wanting to start a shade garden. My shade garden is so full right now, but what did I buy at a plant sale the other day but another little hosta:)

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  2. Love those hostas. I've tried to grow them here but they remain very small if they haven't died. More problem with more sun since the new neighbor cut trees. I'm trying to deal with what I have. Mostly I think this is not a good region to grow them.
    I love your hostas. they are so lush.

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  3. Sure looks good! I think they really need a lot of moisture in the summer to thrive. Ours do OK but do look kind of tired once the late summer hits. Let me know next time you divide your Christmas tree, I'd be interested in swapping for one!

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  4. I don't know why but the name fits the shape of the plant perfectly. For some reason the word "hosta" provides a visual image of roundness and fullness. They're beautiful. Many thanks for introducing me to this big gem.

    Greetings from London.

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  5. My problem with hostas is that they grow too big. I had to remove the ones in our herb garden as they were taking over. But I agree about the value of an easy care shade lover.

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  6. I wish I could get mine to grow really big...more moisture might help.

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  7. I love Hosta. I divide and spread and add them as I catch them on the discount rack. My issue with them, VOLES love them as well. I must keep them in their pot and plant the pot for them to survive the chompers of the tunnel dwelling varmits! I try to keep them happy with lots of water but being under drought coniditions, makes it difficult and by summers end, they are looking pretty blah. But in the spring, they bounch back as you say....

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  8. Could that be 'Sum and Substance'? I used to grow that variety and yours looks like it may be. Another large favorite that I used to grow was 'Blue Angel'. I do miss having the right spot for a hosta, so I planted one in a container this year and stuck it beneath my roses and behind white salvia greggii.

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    1. I don't think it is 'Sum and Substance' though it looks similar. I will try to figure it out when it blooms. I have 'Blue Angel' too but it is not as large as this one. I think your hosta in a container will do really well. Hopefully no deer will eat it.

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  9. My hostas came out too early, froze and many are now a memory...mine do well all summer but we do not have quite the heat you do...I have a very similar hosta that has since lost its tag so I am no help.

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  10. Your hostas are beautiful! I wish I had enough shade o be able to keep them. Very little shade in my yard.

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  11. I have a few shade spots in my garden this year. I'm going to look for this type for my garden thanks so much for the helpful info!!

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  12. I love hostas, but without fencing, I am not going to put a lot in the garden for deer food. I read that Sum and Substance can handle more sun, so might try that one...a protected area but a bit more sun than I think most hostas can handle.

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  13. Hi tina, I like hostas, but when they were in the garden found myself in a frantic war over them with the snails. The snails wanted them more than me. So they won the battle but lost the war, or I guess both snails and i lost the war because there are no more hostas in the garden. You know the names of 2/ 30 cultivars - that's 2 more than most of us. cheers, catmint

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  14. They are a great carefree plant.

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  15. I don't have hostas yet in our garden here. The foliage is really pretty.

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