Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Red Camellia: It's a 'Black Tie' Event

From In the Garden

The spring blooming japonica camellias have made their presence known here at Tiger Gardens. There are three and while I really like them all, my heart belongs with the sasanqua camellias. I like the sasanquas reliable bloom time in the fall when the blooms are pretty much perfect and not damaged by cold weather like the spring blooming japonicas sometimes have to endure. The three japonica camellias I grow here are: 'Black Tie' camellia (double red camellia and it is pictured), 'Nuccio's Gem' (a double white one that tends to get damaged by the cold just as Skeeter posted about), and an unknown peachy double camellia. All three are attractive shrubs even when not in bloom.

My garden is rated Zone 6B and most of my seven camellias are rated to Zone 7. My secret for growing them in my garden has been to place them on the north side of something-like my home or a tree. This winter had me worried
that my camellias might be damaged with all the talk of "it being the coldest winter in a l-o-n-g time" . That has not been the case. There is very minor damage to some leaves that can be easily cut off but all mature shrubs are in fantastic shape. The cold winter has not affected the bloom and all seven shrubs look pretty good. 'Black Tie' has to be my favorite. It has reliably bloomed each year, is undemanding, and a real standout when there is little else blooming in the garden with the deep red blooms. The picture above does not rightly do the deep red justice but take my word for it, the bloom is blood red. It is a very attractive plant that is quite dense in glossy foliage too. I planted 'Black Tie' in 2005 as a one gallon pot plant and it is now about 5'+ tall and 3' feet around. It is most happy here....

From In the Garden
in the garden....enjoying these springtime blooms.


Words and Photos Property of In the Garden Blog Team,

In the Garden

36 comments:

  1. Love that Camellia, such a lovely color. Glad none of yours were damaged by the long cold winter.

    Enjoy ~ FlowerLady

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  2. You all are so lucky to be able to grow such a beautiful bush.

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  3. Tina,
    Duke gardens has a Black Tie it is a winner like yours!

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  4. I'd be interested in knowing what you are feeding your camellia; that is a remarkable growth rate. Congratulations on successful zone pushing!

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  5. You were really lucky Tina. Mother's camellias were really hurt by the cold weather. I checked at the arboretum Saturday and their bushes had some blooms, but were not as pretty as they have been. You have some beautiful blooms on yours!

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  6. It's a beautiful bloom! My only
    C japonica's petals are all brown tipped....Not attractive in a camellia! I think I'll try the fall bloomers...or try to find a friendlier spot for a few japonicas.
    gail

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  7. Tina- I am very impressed with the rate of growth of your 'Black Tie'. I always think of Camellias as slow growers....but I don't have any so what do I know?? I do hope to have a few in SC so I will keep 'Back Tie' in mind.

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  8. This is a beautiful camellia you have featured. I can't imagine the color being any more beautiful than it is here.

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  9. Flowerlady, I'm most glad too and probably a lot lucky.

    Dawn, They are southern charmers indeed.

    Randy, Well now my 'Black Tie' is feeling really special to share that with Duke gardens is awesome.

    Les, All acid lovers get a dose of food in March, always before a really good rain. They are also all heavily mulched. I think these camellias just kind of like the full shade, moist and acid soil and want to grow and grow. A phenomenal growth rate for sure. Close to one foot per year for this one. The sasanqua that is 15' tall was planted in 2001 and it is has a faster growth rate. Maybe the cultivar? Some in the yard don't grow as fast but are still all good sized except for one japonica.

    Linda, That is a bummer! I hope the camellias recover. There have been dire warnings on damage. We'll see how the brugs and bananas do. Cross your fingers.

    Gail, The darker colored japonicas seem to do better for some reason. I too have a white one that is marred. Bummer.

    Janet, When they are happy they are very happy and grow pretty fast. Maybe they will slow down once they get more mature. You know they can grow really big. I'm hoping they don't grow out of bounds.

    Thank you Darla, I am partial to the strong pure colors so the pinkish was not at all what I wanted to show on here. But it's all good.

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  10. I love your camellia! I have a pretty pink bush (not sure what kind) that turns mushy brown after it blooms. I think this is due to the cold, rainy weather we have many times in the spring. I also have some fall blooming ones, and like you, I think their blooms tend to be prettier. Thanks for including a picture of the whole bush, it looks very healthy! Carla

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  11. That us really lovely. Wonderful color and attractive foliage. I'd give a lot to be able to grow them here. This one has a bloom a little like a rose.
    Marnie

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  12. Sunny beautiful day today! I have garden plans...

    Camellias are beautiful bushes no matter what color bloom they give us. Even my white ones are pretty until the cold gets them. I enjoy the blooms while I have them then the icky brown death. I would so much rather have red them white... I prune a bit here and there and keep pine straw at her feet and she thrives on the north side of the house. They are great plants...

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  13. Sometimes those hardiness zones are really good for an extra zone. I think it's just what they are comfortable stating for the consumer. Your camellia looks great!

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  14. Stunning! I've seen camellias that had been in home gardens for decades. If yours are that happy and vigorous after this winter, I think you have no worries.

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  15. WOW, amazing how large it got in only 5 years. Black tie is extra elegant even for a camellia. Glad there wasn't a problem with the extra cold weather.

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  16. 'My secret for growing them in my garden has been to place them on the north side of something-like my home or a tree'

    This is what I like gardening from a non-gardener's point of view. It's so creative that I just can't think of myself doing the same. Many thanks. It was a beautiful post.

    Greetings from London.

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  17. Tina, I'm glad your camellias survived the winter. The red one is beautiful. I've never seen a camellia, Do thye have a scent?

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  18. Carla, Thanks! I always like to include long shots (it's more my thing) so one can see the whole picture. Camellias are wonderful for all of us.

    Marnie, The camellia bloom is so like a rose you wish there was a scent. This has the perfect color too.

    Skeeter, Yes, I agree camellias are beautiful no matter what. I really like the foliage and the evergreeness of the shrub. Just made a new word:)

    GSS, You are very welcomed.

    Dave, Yes, but I'm not too smart because I often lose plants too. But the best trial is experimenting and I lucked out here. How is your brug doing? Mine are about to bloom-lots of blooms. Can't wait to smell it.

    Cameron, Gotta love the camellias. They will outlive me no doubt.

    Lzyjo, Did you think it a bad winter? I just don't. I can remember a winter in 85-86 that was pretty rough. Even with the snow this year it has been nice. I think the summer will be even better for us.

    ACIL, It works for me so I hope it works for others. Sharing helps keep gardening easy.

    Melanie, If there is a downfall for camellias it is that that are scentless. Everyone always wants to smell them but there is nothing there:(

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  19. What a awesome photo of a perfect flower.

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  20. 'Black Tie' is beautiful. I really like the way it grows. It's strange how sometimes we expect weather to have bad effects on certain plants, but they end up doing fine or even better.

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  21. My Camellia was loaded with blooms despite the harsher cold we had this winter. I have it planted on the East side of a tree but SE of my house. Go figure. I don't believe I've seen so many blooms as this yr. I got the plant in Ga. I've had it a good number of yrs & it's not 5' yet.
    A beautiful sunny day here so I'm planting some plants that my brother brought to me from Ga. A brug {white} that he rooted, a gardenia, an heirloom boxwood, a couple plants I don't know the names & a begonia also unknown. So you can see I've been busy.

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  22. Mom, Thanks! Can't wait to see you all. Getting close.

    Catherine, I for sure lucked out with no damage.

    Lola, That is SO wonderful. Glad you can get in the garden and plant all those plants. Your brother is a sweetie to bring you some.

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  23. Tina, that Camellia is stunning and the 'Black Tie' is most fitting... absolutely beautiful.

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  24. Wait ~ the north side?? Not the south side (for extra protection??) I'm completely confused. I guess because when I'm trying to push zones, I try to plant where it's warmer. Whatever works tho! and obviously what you're doing is working. It's gorgeous. I wish I could have one too. Too bad you aren't in zone 5 ~ I'd give it a try!!

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  25. Tina it's beautiful!!! And, I can't wait to finally meet Jean -yeah!!! My yard is just buzzing with flowers and buds but nothing quite that pretty yet -just waiting on those lilacs:0) Kiddos keeping me busy -but I'm still enjoying the info and posts not as much time to type with Lil Bundle on the move, lol. Have a great evening - ciao.

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  26. Ditto Anonymous!!!!!!! I am soooooo excited.

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  27. i have always loved camellias.
    i haven't seen a red one though and yours is gorgeous.
    enjoy your blossoms.

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  28. I forgot to mention that my Camellia was dbl pink. Sure wish I had a red one. May try that later.

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  29. I do wish I could grow camellias! Glad this past winter didn't do any damage to yours, Tina; they're such beautiful flowers. I know you've explained this before, but I've forgotten--why do you plant them on the north side rather than the south side?

    Wishing you and your family a happy Easter!

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  30. Di, thanks!

    Kathleen and Rose, I plant my camellias on the north side so they stay dormant longer. Here we get warm days and cold. If the camellias warm up too much during the day then the temp drops, they will be freeze dried and not a pretty sight. Leaving them in the shade helps ensure they stay dormant and don't suffer freeze burn when the night comes. I know it's opposite than what most folks think. But since these are evergreens they really never go dormant like herbaceaous perennials you might want in a warm spot to push the zone. It works here and I've tried both ways so to the north I go.

    Mom and Anonymous and Skeeter, We'll have a get together here at the house one day. It seems to be the best place. I'll let everyone know the date and time when we get closer. Anonymous, any days you can't come? We'll get together on email.

    Marmee, they are a wonderful thing for us here in the south.

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  31. Nina, please let me know if you have any conflicts. I knew I was forgetting someone but it has been a long day in a client's garden. I am sorry. My mother's plans are not set in stone. We just know a few dates so far.

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  32. The pic looks lovely. It amazes me how much knowledge you have about so many plants! Do you have silvery hair with a staff in hand? I can imagine she-Gandalf when I think about you.

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  33. 'Black Tie' is beautiful. I love the color.

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  34. I have the same plant, planted in same zone and it is against my house. I have brown encircled with white spots on it and I am trying to figure out if it's something an organic pesticide/fungicide/miticide can take care of or if it's viral. Any ideas?

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    1. Hi Kerre, So sorry about your camelia problems. I can't really diagnose from afar so I would advise you to take a sample to your local extension agent. All counties should have them nearby. In the meantime here is a link to a camelia website that might help you out. I definitely do not recommend any pesticides until you know what the problem may be. If you did it would be like a shot in the dark-you might hit it but you might not. It would be like treating you for an ear infection when you in fact only have a toothache. You must diagnose first then treat. The local extension agent can help you if you are unable to come up with a viable solution on your own. Good luck!

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